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Another Round of Beladen? Or, The New "Go" Infection

On Wednesday July 22, 2009 we started seeing what looks to be a new round of beladen style website infections by cybercriminals.

The reason we think they’re beladen style is that they appear to infect all the websites on shared servers and they also seem to be remotely controlled with a “on as needed” mode.

This infection resulted in thousands more sites being tagged with Google’s “This site may harm your computer”.

According to Google Diagnostics for certain websites we were asked to help with, this is what was shown:

“Malicious software is hosted on 4 domain(s), including: ventsol.info/, ina6co.com/, goscansoon.com/.”

Other sites we were asked to help with were also showing these domains in their Google Diagnostics:

  • daobrains.info/
  • safetyshareonline.com/
  • goslimscan.com/
  • goscansome.com/
  • globalsecurityscans.com/

Our scanners were detecting suspicious obfuscated javascript on the sites we were helping with, but it appeared to only be setting cookies to expire the following day. The obfuscated javascript was this:

malscript-0-11

Which deobfuscated looks like:

sessionid=39128605A531; path=/; expires=Thu, 23 Jul 2009 18:42:32 GMT

We found similar code with various names for the “var” part (replacing oigmlob) above in the obfuscated code. Other names were:

  • dtxzidl
  • bmno
  • wcdg
  • tpet
  • stqfpbc
  • meuhgor

In addition, we also saw various combinations of the hexidecimal numbers to replace the actual letters. For instance, instead of pa\x74h=/\x3b ex\x70ir\x65s we found these as well:

  • p\x61th=/\x3b exp\x69r\x65s
  • p\x61\x74h=/\x3b \x65x\x70i\x72es
  • p\x61t\x68=/\x3b expi\x72e\x73

All of these deobfuscate to: path=/; expires

One common theme was the hosting providers. Wouldn’t you know that a day after we blog about how wrongly accused many hosting providers are for the gumblar, martuz and iframe infections that they actually become the target.

It appears that these recent infections are a server issue and not just a specific website on a shared server. How the server became infected is purely speculation. Could it have been from one set of compromised FTP credentials that was able to infect the server and then control other sites as well? Could it have been SQL injection for one site that then gave the attackers a method to start a process on the server thereby controlling all the websites on that server?

Who knows. At this point all we do know is that this does affect all the websites on infected servers.

How do we know that?

We created a program for situations like this. It grabs a list of all the websites for a specific IP address and starts checking them. On some IP addresses 91% of the websites were showing the obfuscated cookie code from above. Our thought is that since this is an “on again – off again” type of infection, the other 9% were dormant when our program scanned those sites.

Another interesting observation was that for a specific IP address, each website showed the exact same obfuscated code. While websites on different IP addresses had similar obfuscated code with the slight variations mentioned previously.

The first step in this “drive-by” infection was to set a cookie on the visitor’s PC. Then if that same visitor came back within the expiration period of the cookie (24 hours), this would be delivered to their browser:

malscript-1-1

Which essentially does a Meta tag redirect. The above deobfuscates to:

malscript-2-1

We did see some of the other domains mentioned earlier in place of safetyshareonline.com and the goscansoon.com.

The whole purpose of this attack is to infect the PCs of visitor’s to these websites. This is done with this bit of social engineering code:

malscript-3-1

This code uses some fake graphics (okay the graphics are real, but they’re not the “official” graphics of Microsoft) in an attempt to trick the visitor into believing they have a virus. The code starts by checking to see if the operating system on the visitor’s PC is Microsoft’s Vista. If it is, it displays “Vista” looking graphics. If not Vista, then it assumes Windows XP and shows different graphics.

No matter who you are or what operating system and browser you have, this code shows a window that looks like a “Windows Security Center” window and it informs you that:

 “Virus (I-Worm.Trojan.b) was found on your computer! Click OK to install System Security Antivirus.” If you select “OK” from their screen it will download their “antivirus”.

If you cancel, a new alert is displayed with this message:

 “Windows Security Center recommends you to install System Security Antivirus.”

If you cancel that, it will display again.

One more cancel gets you to this message:

“Your computer remains infected by viruses! They can cause data loss and file damages and need to be cured as soon as possible. Return to System Security and download it to secure your PC”

This is some very elaborate scheming by hackers and cybercriminals just to get visitors to download their “mother lode of infectious code”, but it will probably work on many people.

We decided to show the code here, although the code is inserted graphic files, so that if your website starts being tagged as suspicious by Google with some of the domains listed here, and you get the “This site may harm your computer” moniker, you can compare this code to some of the code you might see in your site and have a better understanding of what is going on.

What To Do

First you need to contact your hosting provider. Have them read this blog post so they can also better understand what’s going on.

Have them check at the server level for unusual processes running on the server. If you’d like, have them contact us and we can help them diagnose this further. We can show them the other websites on your server that are also infected with the exact same code.

At this point we still don’t know how the server gets infected. Be prudent and scan your PCs with a different anti-virus than what you’re currently using. Why? Because if you are infected and you have anti-virus already installed, then it’s obvious that the virus knows how to evade detection of your current security.

We’ve had good success with AVG, Avast or Avira. If you already have one of those installed, then use one of the others. You need to use something different. Scan and clean all PCs with FTP access to your site.

Then change FTP passwords on all of your accounts.

This will have to be done as soon as you start seeing these infections as it may take some time to fully investigate and remediate – so don’t be late (sorry, it’s been a long few days).

Post comments below if you’ve been infected by this or know someone who has.

Thank you.

Friday July 24, 2009 update: We worked with a couple different hosting providers who had servers infected with this and it appears the way these malscripts are injected into the the webpages is through a process on the server. The cybercriminals have cleverly named this process “crontab” however this process runs under the user name “nobody” typically the same user name that Apache (or httpd) runs as.

The file that executes this process is remotely deleted by the cybercriminals controlling it so it just runs in memory. Once the server is rebooted, the process disappears and doesn’t appear to return. The hosting providers also mentioned implementing suPHP as an aid to blocking this from happening again.

This is quite clever as how many times does a shared server really get rebooted? Probably not very often unless there’s a reason to shut-down numerous (hundreds?) websites all at once.

Keep posted, we’ll be adding more information as we get it.

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What Conficker was – and wasn't

Well, the big April 1st “dooms day” has come and gone.

I’ll admit that even though we really didn’t think anything malicious was going to happen, we did add a Conficker scanner to The Box (our security appliance at www.ebasedsecurity.com) so we could scan our client’s systems.

Let me explain our thinking.  We’ve been following Conficker all along the way. From the first strain to the most recent, we’ve been watching with our honeypots – collecting data and samples and determining what could happen. We’ve seen the changes, what it does and how it communicates with it’s “mother ship” waiting for it’s next set of instructions.

When news of Conficker hit mass media, (60 Minutes did a piece on it) our non-technical gut feeling was that the cybercriminals wouldn’t actually do anything malicious with their code. There was too much public awareness.

Keep in mind that if they had, they could have created some real havoc on the Internet. Some experts (my Dad’s definition of an expert is: an ex is a has been and a spirt is a drip under pressure) estimate that anywhere from 10 million to 100 million PCs are infected with Conficker.

If a cybercriminal or a group of cybercriminals have remote control of that many PCs and they decided to launch an attack against some main Internet servers, they could overload them with so much bogus traffic as to basically eliminate them from accessibility.

Now, if they attacked the main DNS servers on the Internet (the servers that convert domain names to IP addresses) could they slow down or shut-down the Internet? Possibly.

However, nothing happened.

Or did it?

What actually happened might be exactly what the cybercriminals wanted.

How many of you did Google searches for Conficker over the past week (the week before April 1)?

Many, many (our research showed that over 1.7 million ) people searched for “conficker scanner” or “conficker removal”, “remove conficker”, “find conficker” and numerous other terms.

Did you realize that many of the search results were offering solutions that actually infected your PC? Many of the websites that were displayed as a result of those search terms were created by the cybercriminals!

Could this have been the real intention of the cybercriminals? If so, this could be the biggest social engineering hack of all time. We examined many of these sites and found a number of them (64%) were selling Conficker scanners and removal tools. All of these “tools” we found were actually RATs (Remote Access Trojans) which actually provided the cybercriminals with remote control of the PC it was installed on.

And, “they” (the cybercriminals) got you to pay for it!

Are these guys geniuses or what?

Many of the sites that weren’t selling bogus removal tools tried to infect any PC that visited their site. These infected webpage sites used a variety of sneaky methods to infect PCs. One instance we found actually tried 17 different attacks on all the PCs visiting it’s infectious website.

If you’ve been following us, you know that legitimate websites serving malware are increasing. This coupled with infected websites serving malware makes the Internet a very dangerous place.

Fortunately for all of our clients with The Box, they don’t have to worry about things like this because The Box doesn’t allow downloads from non-whitelisted websites. What a concept.

That’s what Conficker was and what it wasn’t.

Anyone have comments? (comments that aren’t SPAM)

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Bomb Threat SPAM

Cybercriminals are using cleverly crafted SPAM messages to get you to click on a link that supposedly takes you to a Reuter’s video of bomb blasts in your area.

I say cleverly crafted because the email will change based on where your IP address is. For instance, I received one with a subject line of, “Are you and your friends okay?”.

When I clicked on the link (yes as part of my research), I saw a webpage that showed the Reuter’s logo with, “Powerful explosion burst in Chicago this morning”. There’s a graphic to see the video with text below that reads, “At least 12 people have been killed and more than 40 wounded in a bomb blast near market in Chicago. Authorities suggested that explosion was caused by “dirty” bomb. Police said the bomb was detonated from close by using electric cables.”

Scanning through our logs of SPAM for our clients using The Box, we’ve been able to see how the message refers to a different major nearby city depending on where the client receives their email.

The video will install some malware via a download. We’ve identified the trojan as a strain of Waled or Waledac depending on your AV.

Other subject lines we’ve seen are: “Take Care!”, “At least 18 killed in your city” (which is interesting as all the emails we’ve seen state that 12 have been killed), “I hope you are not in the city now”, “Bomb blast near you” and a host of others.

We’ve reported before on how clever cybercriminals are to use hype and fear as examples of social engineering to get people to want to click on their links. When clicked, systems become infected.

Cyber threats such as these will continue as long as they’re successful at hooking at least a few million people. Hackers are making good money through their craft and will not stop. Using extreme fear and directing visitors to infectious websites will always be a tactic they pull out every once in awhile. This will die down and then in another few months they’ll use some other alarmist strategy and infect some more computers.

That’s what they do.

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Social Networks & Social Engineering – Twitter Round 2

Continuing on from Round 1, I decided to take a step further and show you exactly how susceptible you are to a socially engineered infection through Twitter. Actually it’s more an attack through TinyURL.com, but since Twitter automatically converts URLs in your Tweets (ugh!), it is an attack via Twitter.

For this example, let’s say that a hacker wants to construct a website that references some research on Harvard’s website. It would be on a topic that is of high interest at the moment.

First the hacker (cybercriminal) would use Google Trends (www.google.com/trends) to see what’s hot. As of today (03/02/2009) the list is as follows:

  • granville waiters
  • nyc doe
  • wavy tv 10
  • new york city department of education
  • dr. seuss birthday
  • opm.gov
  • wvec
  • nyc public school closings
  • nyc board of education
  • newport news public schools

These are the top 10.

Nothing in there that is really eye catching that covers a broad scope of people. I’ll use dr. seuss birthday.

Our cybercriminal would construct some basic information about how Harvard University has created this research paper detailing the events behind Dr. Seuss stories. Our cybercriminal needs to have something that already indicates some legitimacy and some validation. For this scenario I’m using Harvard University for 2 reasons; they already carry a huge credibility factor and they have a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability that let’s me use their URL for redirection.

The cybercriminal would take the XSS URL and instead of redirecting the reader to another page inside of Harvard’s website, use it to redirect the unsuspecting reader to their malicious website.

Here is the original URL: http://hms.harvard.edu/lshell/WhitePagesdefault.asp?task=staffandfaculty&theurl=

By appending any URL we want to the end of the above string, it will look like we’re sending you to harvard.edu, however, this vulnerability will actually take you somewhere else.

For instance, if I wanted to send you to my website I would use:

http://hms.harvard.edu/lshell/WhitePagesdefault.asp?task=staffandfaculty&theurl=http://www.wewatchyourwebsite.com

Go ahead and click on that and you’ll see what I mean.

Now, that’s not too bad. I if showed you that link in an email or on my Twitter account, you might not see the end of the URL and just click on it to see what Harvard has to say about Dr. Seuss.

But remember that Twitter uses TinyURL.com which converts any long URLs into “tiny” URLs. Plugging that long URL into TinyURL.com’s website it gives me:

http://www.tinyurl.com/av46js

With TinyURL.com’s preview function I could see the exact URL of the above TinyURL. Maybe you’d see the redirection at the end and maybe not.

Now, our crafty cybercriminal knows that TinyURL.com has this preview function, so he (we’ll assume a male hacker) converts the URL of his malicious website to one you can’t recognize. This is called URL obfuscation (I love using that word).

This would take my URL of http://www.wewatchyourwebsite.com and convert it to: %68%74%74%70%3a%2f%2f%77%77%77%2e%77%65%77%61%74%63%68%79%6f%75%72%77%65%62%73%69%74%65%2e%63%6f%6d

If you saw this by itself, hopefully you’d be suspicious and avoid the urge to click on it. However, when used at the backend of an already long URL, you might just throw caution into the wind and click away.

Our Harvard URL would become:

http://hms.harvard.edu/lshell/WhitePagesdefault.asp?task=staffandfaculty&theurl=%68%74%74%70%3a%2f%2f%77%77%77%2e%77%65%77%61%74%63%68%79%6f%75%72%77%65%62%73%69%74%65%2e%63%6f%6d

Which when converted to a TinyURL.com would result in: http://tinyurl.com/bnq5ej

Go ahead and click on that to see what I mean. As of today, that XSS on Harvard’s site has not been fixed so it will load their frame, but inside will be our home page. Keep in mind that even with TinyURL.com’s preview function, you would only see the obfuscated URL with all the percent signs. This might give you a false sense of security and decide to trust your “gut” and go for it. That’s what the cybercriminal is hoping for.

Obviously our website isn’t going to infect your computer, however, if the redirection URL were to take you to the cybercriminals infectious webpage, you’d be infected and not even know it.

To recap, the purpose of this information is to show you the steps a cybercriminal would follow to use social engineering to spread their malware. They would use Google Trends to find a hot topic, they would use the credibility of some other site, Harvard in this example, they would use obfuscation to hide their work from people who know what to look for and they would use Twitter or some other social networking site to find as many people as they could.

As stated earlier, this isn’t so much a vulnerability of Twitter as it is with TinyURL.com, but since Twitter uses TinyURL.com, it does reflect back on them.

Any comments, questions or remarks? Please post them (unless it’s SPAM).

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Social Networks & Social Engineering – Twitter Round 1

My first review will be Twitter. I selected Twitter because it’s widely used and even easier for social engineering than some of the others.

First a little background on Twitter. Many people categorize Twitter as a “micro” blog. This means you can post short (140 character) messages that communicate your current thoughts, actions, wants or needs.

From their website Nicholas Carr describes it as “the telegraph system of Web 2.0” while the New York Times states, “It’s one of the fastest growing phenomena on the Internet.”

The first thing I noticed about Twitter is that most links posted by members are the shortened version of a full URL. Some of the more populare sites for these services are:

  • TinyURL.com
  • bit.ly
  • get-shorty.com
  • SnipURL.com

These services take a URL like: http://www.wewatchyourwebsite.com/defacements/HackedByAL-GaRNi-sample-2.jpg and convert it to something like: www.tinyurl.com/88888

Using these shortened URLs on Twitter allows members to include some description with their link.

I’ve always had a problem with these shortened URLs. Having seen numerous SPAM messages with embedded shortened URLs in order to evade detection, I set out to investigate further.

You never know what the ultimate destination is when clicking on these links. You could easily be led to an infectious webpage. Infectious websites are one of the most popular tactics of cybercriminals to deliver their malware.

I scanned our SPAM traps for messages that included these shortened URLs. I used one of our secured systems to see where these links ultimately delivered my browser.

Much to my surprise, all of the links that used TinyURL.com delivered the following message:

“The TinyURL (shows link) you visited was used by it’s creator in violation of our terms of use. TinyURL has a strict no abuse policy and we apologize for the intrusion this user has caused you. Such violation of our terms of use include:

  • Spam – Unsolicited Bulk E-mail
  • Fraud or Money Making scams
  • Malware
  • or any other use that is illegal”

This tells me that they’re either policing their links or that they actually take action on misuse of their service – this is awesome. I suggest that before clicking on any TinyURL, replace tinyurl.com with preview.tinyurl.com. For instance if you see a link like: http://www.tinyurl.com/8888, before clicking on it, change the URL to: http://preview.tinyurl.com/8888. The resulting webpage will show you exactly where the link will take you with a link that says, “Proceed to this site.”

I know this is somewhat of an inconvenience, but so is having your PC sending millions of SPAM messages after you’ve been added to a huge botnet.

You see, with any security situation, you always have to consider the risk involved when the potentially weakest link is the responsibility of someone else.

With these shortened URLs, you’re depending on the URL shortening service to provide you with some level of protection.

One other service I investigated, SnipURL.com clearly states on their website:

“SnipURL has a number of operational functions in place to protect the confidentiality of information. However, perfect security on the Internet does not exist, and SnipURL does not warrant that its site is impenetrable or invulnerable to hackers.”

At least they admit that perfect security does not exist, but don’t think that you’re safe clicking on a shortened URL link.

I believe that any free service is going to be exploited by cybercriminals. I’ve seen many times where even fee based services are abused by cybercriminals.

You had better fully trust the person or organization behind the Twitter posting before you blindly click on a shortened link on their site – because you’re either relying on the poster or Twitter. If that little bird in your head is telling you to be careful, you shouldn’t be clicking on it no matter how important you think it might be.

Have you had situations of a security breach on Twitter? If so, let us know by posting a comment.

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Social Networks & Social Engineering – What a Pair

When we started this service we knew that one of our main goals was to “get the word out” on how websites have been in the line of fire for cybercriminals. We published a report, “How Cybercriminals Use Your Website to Distribute their Malware”, but found not many people were interested in what we had to say. We blamed on it “head in the sand” mentality.

We looked to the Internet Marketing world to see how they do it. Some of them have actually sold thousands of e-books for as much as $27 a piece. They must know some secret that we didn’t.

Our studying introduced us to the works of some big name Internet Marketers (IMers). Names like Frank Kern, Jeff Walker, Brian Clark, Yanik Silver and many others all seemed to resonate one key strategy – build community. On of their favorite strategies is using social networks to build this community of loyal followers.

I shouldn’t say it’s one of their strategies, it’s one of their tactics. Their strategy is to always provide something of value. The social networks is just one way they suggest you use to distribute your valuable message.

Using social networks seemed like a great idea so I set out to explore this value distribution tactic. I did this with my ever present security guard on – that’s how I roll.

My exploration included sites like: Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, LinkedIn and FastPitch.

Over the next few weeks I’ll be revealing my findings and then suggest ways (tactics) you can protect your informational assets while taking advantage of social networks.

I titled this posting “Social Networks & Social Engineering – What a Pair” because many of the tactics of cybercriminals revolve around social engineering which is the art of deceiving others into clicking on a link that you think is safe.

As I write this, I’ve been bombarded with emails about people who received errors while trying to view your profile on Facebook. What happens is when someone clicks on your profile they get an error saying that they could find out the problem by installing the “Error Check System”. You’ll get notifications that “X” number of people have been getting errors while viewing your profile and this “application” will help you determine the cause.

If you Google “Error Check System” Facebook, at least one of the links takes you to an infectious website that will display a message telling you you’re infected with a virus and offers to scan your system. Of course, this is a social engineering attempt. If you agree to the scan, you’ll be downloading a virus. This has been a very popular tactic of cybercriminals lately. They have even started creating websites that offer reviews of anti-virus software – more social engineering, to earn your trust.

I thought the timing of this Facebook “Error Check System” scam was perfect for me to start this series.

Come on back and read the follow-ups.

If you’ve had any experiences with one of the social networking sites, post a comment and let us know.

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Malware and Internet Marketing Methods

Everyone knows that in order to be successful online you have to have visitors and buyers – makes sense right?

In working toward getting this site more visitors and thus more buyers (clients) I’ve studied many of the methods that some of the top Internet Marketing people have promoted. Building a community of readers is one way of getting and keeping visitors.

People like Frank Kern, Jeff Walker and many others promote using Web 2.0 to promote your site. They recommend and use sites like Twitter and Facebook. I’ll admit to having an account on both sites and I try to make some worthy posts on both, however, the security gnome inside me keeps wondering how safe are these sites. Okay, there’s no wondering, I know how safe they aren’t.

I personally know of many people who have been burned by fake emails purporting to be from someone they know, or someone who found them on Facebook, telling them to view a video online or view a document online only to fall victim to this social engineering tactic and become infected. When you see the amount of infected websites that I see everyday, you might be less likely to just click on any website.

For instance, Twitter has a message size limit of 141 characters. Many people will post a link on when they “Tweet” (ugh!). Often times, I’ve seen postings that use tinyurls. This is a service that allows you to place a very long URL into a shortened version that links directly to www.tinyurl.com, which then redirects you to the original link. Any cybercriminal could use this same service (and has) to masquerade their intended infectious website.

You see cybercriminals are extremely intelligent and crafty. They go where the masses go. If everyone’s going to Facebook, cybercriminals will be all over that site trying to find ways to use Facebook’s strengths to exploit the weakest link in any security strategy – human curiosity.  I’ve seen emails with wording like, “Unless you really need to (fill-in the blank) , please don’t click on this link as we can only handle a certain amount of traffic.” And I’m sure they get a lot of people clicking on that link just because they want to know what’s on the other side.

I can’t emphasize it enough. You have to be wary of every email you get that looks like it’s from some social networking site. Every email.

While I agree with Frank Kern and Jeff Walker about using Web2.0 tools to promote your site, I also worry about all those unsuspecting Internet Marketing rookies that will undoubtedly fall victim to some scam running on one of those sites.

Back in December 2008, Facebook users were subjected to the Koobface worm. This worm infected many by sending bogus emails to Facebook users taunting them with subject lines like; “Check you out in this video”. When the user clicks on the link in the email, they’re either redirected to a malware delivery site, or told they need to download a file in order to view the video. The file downloaded is the infection.

Many Facebook walls had these same malicious links posted so anyone who visited that persons profile would at least be presented with the infectious offering.

In January of 2009, users of the social networking site LinkedIn were subjected to bogus profiles of some top name celebrities. Names such as: Beyonce Knowles, Victoria Beckham, Christina Ricci, Kirsten Dunst, Salma Hayek and Kate Hudson were among the list of stars with bogus profiles. People clicking on these sites were offered various temptations – each one an infectious present.

Anyone else have any stories about someone falling victim to a social networking, socially engineered attack?

Leave a comment if you have one.

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Is the Internet worth it?

I know I’ll be accused of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) with this post but here goes.
The whole world knows the Internet is used for building businesses. Some businesses rely solely on the Internet – they simply wouldn’t exist without it.
However, with all the security threats, at some point you have to ask: Is it worth it?

On November 12, 2008 the 63rd Session of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Council met and discussed the current state of cybersecurity. The event concluded with the declaration that cyber-security is one of the most important challenges of our time. The ITU Secretary-General, Dr. Hamadoun Toure stated: “The costs associated with cyber threats and cyber-attacks are real and significant — not only in terms of lost revenue, breaches of sensitive data, cyber-attacks and network outages but also in terms of lives ruined by identity theft, debts run up on plundered credit cards or the online exploitation of children.”

While I might not totally agree with the severity he states, I do agree that the situation is bleak – and apparently only getting worse.

Hackers use any method available to achieve their goal – total domination of the Internet. Okay, that’s really extreme.

Think of your own specific situation. You undoubtedly have at least one anti-virus (AV) program installed on your working computers, right? (many of you have 3-4 different security programs installed)

How many times has it actually caught a virus? If your AV is set to scan once a day, how often has it detected a virus/worm/trojan during it’s scan? If ever, you have to

During the course of the past 2 months we’ve seen the following security issues:

  • Malware delivered by infectious Adobe Acrobat files (pdf)
  • “Common” websites delivering malware (i.e., www.mlb.com, www.businessweek.com, www.cbs.com)
  • 85% of malware being delivered by infectious websites
  • Numerous content management systems (CMS) and forums having various vulnerabilities
  • “Hacking” used in a multitude of political wars (website defacements, etc)
  • More intelligent malware (blocking of AV updates, disabling security software)

In addition to the above list, more malware has been delivered via social engineering. Social engineering is the “art” of using deception to get a user to intentionally install something which turns out to be malware (definition of trojan).

Back in October we saw the keyword “costumes” being abused by cybercriminals to get people to visit malicious websites promising to offer fantastic ideas on Halloween attire. Then in November we saw numerous emails be circulated that offered various food recipes for Thanksgiving many of which resulted in webpages that contained more than recipes. They offered recipes for infection (you can use that if you want).

Along with the holiday themed malware strategies, here in the US we were also going through a Presidential election which brought about an abundance of election themed malware attacks. Then we had the year-end holidays and New Year’s each with their own malware messages and accompanying websites.

Now with the Presidential Inauguration just completed we’ve seen numerous messages “flying” around the internet touting “Obama refuses to take oath”. When any of these links are followed, they lead the unsuspecting inquisitive reader to a website that delivers more than the message they were seeking. It also attempts to infect their computer with little pieces of code that are just the beginning of taking control of the infected PC.

All of this is actual, real world reality. I didn’t make this “stuff” up. I didn’t write these viruses/worms/trojans like some of you think.

Cyber crime is something we all have to deal with.

You’re in business to solve some real world problem. Whether you’re a plumber or a rocket scientist, you solve someone’s problem otherwise you wouldn’t be in business.

I selected computer security as my profession and I believe I do it well. I try to solve real world computer security problems. If you find my work offensive, you’re free to ignore it.

I don’t work in FUD. I just merely try to educate you so you know what you’re facing being online.

Please leave me your comments on this posting.

Thank you.